Immigration and Criminal Lawyers Toronto, Ontario



22 Mar
2013

Canadian government will tighten rules on temporary foreign worker program

Posted in Immigration Law

In an effort to deal with Canada’s unemployment issue, the federal government will push companies to rely less on foreign workers and thus hire more Canadian employees. Essentially, the government plans on connecting Canadian employees with Canadian employers.

Currently, the Temporary Foreign Worker Program allows companies to hire workers from other countries and bring them back to Canada for fairly short work periods. Theoretically, this program is meant to provide workers in instances when Canadian employers cannot find qualified local workers. However, some employers bring workers back again and again. The criticism is that companies use the temporary foreign worker program to find foreign low-cost labour.

The federal government wants to tighten up the rules to make companies hire Canadian workers first.

Some of the changes that will occur include requiring employers to advertise open jobs longer and in more places within Canada.  The government will amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to restrict the identification of non-official languages as job requirements when hiring through the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. The federal government also plans on helping companies that rely on foreign workers to find Canadian employees, and the government will make companies pay fees to cover the processing of labour market opinions so that these costs are no longer absorbed by taxpayers.

The above changes were announced in the 2013 budget.

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12 Mar
2013

Police can look through a password-less phone

Posted in Criminal Law

The Court of Appeal in Ontario indicates that police can look through someone’s phone upon arrest but only if it is not password protected. The court indicates that the police can only take a “cursory” look to see if there is evidence relevant to the crime. If the phone is protected by a password then the police should get a search warrant. Arguably, there is a higher expectation of privacy with a phone that is password protected. The Court of Appeal did not create a specific new rule for all mobile phone searches.

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