Immigration and Criminal Lawyers Toronto, Ontario



26 Jun
2017

Canada imposes a visa requirement on Antigua and Bermuda

Posted in Immigration Law

As of 5:30 am EDT June 27, 2017, citizens from Antigua and Bermuda will need a visa to travel to Canada. At that time, any existing electronic travel authorization issued to a citizen of Antigua and Bermuda will no longer be valid.

For more information, click here.

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7 Jul
2014

Interview with Chris Alexander

Posted in Immigration Law

Canada’s Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, Chris Alexander recently gave an interview regarding new immigration reforms in Russian! To watch the interview, please click here.

 

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10 Apr
2014

Ontario Labour Market Bulletin March 2014

Posted in Immigration Law

Highlights:

  • Ontario Employment grew by 6,100 jobs in February 2014
  • Job gains were primarily realized in full-time employment (+5,300)
  • The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 7.5% in February 2014
  • The unemployment rate for youth aged 15 to 24 was 15.8%, compared with 16.2% in 
  • Job losses in the goods producing sector led by the constructions industry
  • Toronto led the province with 54,900 additional jobs over the past year

Check out Ontario’s March 2014 Labour Market Bulletin by clicking here.

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28 Dec
2013

How one becomes “Canadianized”

Posted in Immigration Law

In a recent decision, a Federal Court judge ruled that the intrinsic values of Canadians can only be understood by those who have spent a significant amount of time in Canada. Further, the judge wrote that being a Canadian was based on “attitudes of respect for others and a willingness to accommodate cultural, social, and economic challenges to resolve our differences”.

This was a case about a Pakistan-born medical student who was granted citizenship by a citizenship judge after spending only 150 days in Canada. This was well below the three years (in the previous four years) required under the Citizenship Act. Citizenship and Immigration appealed and the Federal Court set aside the decision of the citizenship judge. The judge asserted that the law calls for a significant physical residency requirement. Up until this point, the law was interpreted incorrectly to mean that some people could spend only a fraction of the three year residency requirement in Canada and still gain Canadian citizenship. The Federal Court asserted that Canada has a distinct character and institutions, which cannot be learned from abroad.

To read the full case, please click here.

 

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22 Apr
2013

Where are Canada’s temporary foreign workers going?

Posted in Immigration Law

In 2005, there were 140,668 temporary foreign workers admitted into Canada. This year there were 338,189 temporary workers admitted (this number is still considered preliminary). The vast majority of workers (approximately 202,000 in 2012) enter Canada through a positive labour market opinion from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. A positive labour market opinion means that an employer was successful in showing that it needs a foreign worker to fill a job and no Canadian worker was found.

Click here for a breakdown of the types of skills these 202,000 temporary foreign workers (2012) have and the industries in which they are working in.

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16 Apr
2013

Temporary foreign worker program will be reformed

Posted in Immigration Law

Stephen Harper will reform the temporary foreign worker program because it has grown too large. As a result, Ottawa will bring in new rules to ensure it is only used to fill the country’s labour shortages. Mr. Harper said that it is important that employers understand the purpose of the program  which is to provide temporary help in cases where there are acute labour shortages. There is no broader purpose than that. Mr. Harper’s concern about this program arises from recent stories that have surfaced about the ongoing controversy at RBC.

Click here to see full article.

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22 Mar
2013

Canadian government will tighten rules on temporary foreign worker program

Posted in Immigration Law

In an effort to deal with Canada’s unemployment issue, the federal government will push companies to rely less on foreign workers and thus hire more Canadian employees. Essentially, the government plans on connecting Canadian employees with Canadian employers.

Currently, the Temporary Foreign Worker Program allows companies to hire workers from other countries and bring them back to Canada for fairly short work periods. Theoretically, this program is meant to provide workers in instances when Canadian employers cannot find qualified local workers. However, some employers bring workers back again and again. The criticism is that companies use the temporary foreign worker program to find foreign low-cost labour.

The federal government wants to tighten up the rules to make companies hire Canadian workers first.

Some of the changes that will occur include requiring employers to advertise open jobs longer and in more places within Canada.  The government will amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to restrict the identification of non-official languages as job requirements when hiring through the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. The federal government also plans on helping companies that rely on foreign workers to find Canadian employees, and the government will make companies pay fees to cover the processing of labour market opinions so that these costs are no longer absorbed by taxpayers.

The above changes were announced in the 2013 budget.

Click here to see full article

 

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5 Feb
2013

Canada needs to get competitive to attract skilled immigrants: Harper

Posted in Immigration Law

Historically, Canada was one of the few countries in the world that accepted immigrants. Today immigrants are going to a lot more countries than they had previously. According to Stephen Harper, we are now seeing a shift in our immigration system. We are going away from a “passive” immigration system in which Canada accepted people on a first come first serve basis, to a more “active” immigration system in which immigrants are chosen according to their potential benefit to Canada. One program that best embodies the government’s approach is the Canada Experience Class. Under this program, people are granted permanent resident status based on the fact that they have already proven that they can integrate into Canadian society and meet its labour-market needs. Workers and students who have spent time in Canada on temporary permits are given priority in getting their permanent resident status. Their applications are usually processed within one year. Approximately 100,000 students and 200,000 temporary workers come to Canada on an annual basis. This group has a good chance of gaining permanent residency in Canada. Canada plans to admit 265,000 new permanent residents in 2013.

Click here to see full article

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28 Jan
2013

Ottawa to welcome older immigrants to clear family backlog

Posted in Immigration Law

Citizenship and Immigration Minister, Jason Kenney, revealed his government’s intentions to raise family reunifications numbers. Consequently, Canada will welcome approximately 25,000 parents and grandparents as immigrants next year. The government’s main goal is to cut the backlog of applications, which has pushed wait times to up to eight years in some cases. No new family reunification applications will be processed before 2014. In the near future, a new family reunification program is expected.

Click here to see full article

 

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